Category Archives: ANC

President Cyril Ramaphosa

ADDRESS BY PRESIDENT CYRIL RAMAPHOSA AT THE ANC SIYANQOBA RALLY 2019

We are gathered here today, in our tens of thousands, to issue a clarion call to all the people of this great land.

We are gathered here today to say that the future of our country is in your hands.

This is a call to the young people who want to learn and to work and to build a life that is better than what they have today.

It is a call to the mothers and the fathers, who want decent homes and quality health care, who want to live in safe communities, and who want the best for their children.

This is a call to the workers, who want decent wages and a healthy workplace, who want to gain new skills and be given new opportunities.

It is a call to the labour tenants and farm workers, who want land they can call their own, who want water and seeds and implements.

This is a call to all South Africans: black and white, young and old, women and men.

It is a call to action.

It is a call to every South African to vote on Wednesday, the 8th of May, for a new era of growth, renewal and transformation.

This is a decisive moment in our history.

This a moment when we have to choose between the past and the future.

We can choose to return to a past of conflict and anger, of corruption and hunger.

Or we can choose to embark on a path of renewal and go forward to a future of peace and stability, jobs and progress.

As the people of South Africa, let us declare with one clear and loud voice that we choose to go forward.

We choose hope over despair.

We choose renewal over stagnation.

We choose growth over decline.

This is the message that our people gave us as we criss-crossed the country – from Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha in the south to Musina and Thohoyandou in the north, from Ngwavuma and KwaMashu and Mthatha in the east to Mahikeng and Upington and Springbok and Vredendaal in the west.

We have met with workers in factories, on farms and in mines.

We have met with artisans, shop assistants, teachers, nurses, students, artists and pensioners. We have met business people, professionals, farmers, religious leaders and traditional leaders.

We have met people whose lives have been transformed over the last 25 years of democracy.
But we have also met people without work, without proper shelter, without a high school education, without running water or decent sanitation.

We have met people with disability, who have told us about the discrimination they face, about their struggles to access education and the particular difficulties they have finding a job.

We have met young and old, women and men, African, coloured, Indian and white.

We have heard them speak with many voices of their aspirations, their concerns and their frustrations.

And we have heard them speak with one voice about the country they love and the united and fair nation they want to live in.

They have reminded us of the achievements of 25 years – of the houses built, the jobs created, the education provided and the horizons broadened.

But they have also been critical of our shortcomings.

They have told us where service delivery has failed, where infrastructure has not been maintained, where people with authority and responsibility have stolen money.

They are frustrated at the slow rate of economic growth and the grinding effects of poverty and unemployment.

We have heard of the difficulties many of them continue to face in the midst of a tough economic environment, of the bills that need to be paid, of the rising cost of food, fuel and transport.

They have raised these issues with us – directly and bluntly – because they know that the ANC is the only organisation that can address their concerns.

They know the remarkable progress we have made together over 25 years; but they know that more could have been done, and that much more needs to be done.

And so today, as the ANC, we say to the people of South Africa:

We have heard you!

We have listened closely and with humility.

Where we have been found wanting, we accept the criticism.

Where we have made mistakes, we acknowledge them without qualification.

You have told us what you expect of the ANC.

Today – gathered here as the leadership, membership and volunteers of the African National Congress – we say that we are ready.

We are ready to work together, side-by-side with all South Africans, to build a country in which all may thrive and in which all may prosper.

If we are united, there is nothing we cannot achieve.

That is why, working together, we will build a growing economy for the benefit of all.

We have said that we will raise R1.4 trillion in new investment over 5 years.

It has never been done before in this country.

But we are determined to achieve it, because it is through this investment that we will build the factories, mines, call centres, farms and refineries that will create jobs for our people.

It is by removing barriers to investment and ending policy uncertainty, by creating space for new black entrants, by making our economy more competitive, that we will reach far higher levels of inclusive growth.

It is by further strengthening the social compact between government, labour, business, civil society and communities that we will create more decent jobs.

It is through initiatives like the Youth Employment Service, Tshepo 1 Million and NARYSEC that we will create pathways into work for young people.

It is through working with companies to recruit more young people and through removing work experience as a requirement for entry-level jobs that we will unleash the enormous potential of our youth.

It is through our industrial incentive schemes, special economic zones, industrial parks in townships and the black industrialists programme that we will become a manufacturing nation.

It is through the expansion of our small business incubation programme and through greater financial support for small business that we will build a nation of entrepreneurs and innovators.

It is by accelerating the redistribution of land and by financing emerging black farmers that we will ignite an agricultural revolution that transforms the South African countryside.

It is by investing in tourism, mining, telecommunications, textiles and clothing, manufacturing and the oceans economy that we will create a truly diverse economy that can compete in a challenging global environment.

These are not just words.

We have experience.

The ANC has shown, over many years, that we can work with labour and business and communities to mobilise investment, to create jobs, to improve working conditions, to implement a national minimum wage.

As the ANC, we know what it takes to open factories and mines, to attract tourists, to build roads, schools and clinics.

We know what it takes to grow an economy because we have done it before, and, working together, we can do it again.

But if all of these efforts are to be successful, we must ensure that the youth of this country have the skills they need now and into the future.

Working together, we will ensure that all our children receive the best quality education possible.

Every moment in a child’s development is essential.

The ANC will make two years of early childhood development compulsory for all children because this is the firm foundation children need to succeed in life.

If we do not reach our children before the age of 5, they will spend the rest of their lives catching up.

Unless they can read and write from the earliest years of school, they will always struggle to learn, to understand and to find jobs.

Unless they have teachers who are competent and committed, unless they have parents who are supportive, unless we have education officials who are honest and efficient, we will fail our children.

We will not allow another generation of South Africans to be consigned to a life of poverty.

We will not allow the doors of our universities and colleges to remain closed to the children of the poor and the working class.

We will not allow students to emerge from these universities and colleges without the skills they need to find a job.

That is why the ANC is expanding free higher education and investing more in TVET colleges to develop the skills our economy needs.

It is our solemn duty to improve the lives of the poor.

That is why the ANC is building more clinics and hospitals, and training more doctors, nurses and other health workers.

It is why the ANC will build a million houses over the next five years, and ensure that more work opportunities are provided closer to where people live.

The ANC has listened to the voices of women.

They remain the pillars of communities, families and social institutions.

And yet, patriarchal attitudes continue to deny women and girls their dignity and rights.

They bear the brunt of poverty and face discrimination in the workplace.

They are subjected to the most brutal gender-based violence and femicide.

Today, as the ANC, we recommit ourselves to a truly non-sexist South Africa.

Working with the broader women and gender movement, we will continue to take practical steps to advance women’s emancipation.

That is why we will ensure that girl children complete school and realise their academic potential, that women have equal opportunities at work, and that, working together, we end all forms of gender-based violence.
And that is why 53 percent of the ANC’s candidates in this election are women.

Comrades, friends and compatriots,

Let us declare, here and now, that we will never surrender our freedom to corruption and state capture.

We will not submit and we will not retreat.

We will fight with every means at our disposal to ensure that those who occupy positions of authority serve only the public interest.

Over the last year, we have taken decisive steps to fight corruption across society.

The Zondo Commission is uncovering the nature and extent of state capture.

We have done much to restore the credibility and effectiveness of the NPA, SARS, SAPS and the State Security Agency.

But the road ahead is long, and there is still much more to do.

We should expect resistance from those who have benefited from wrongdoing.

But let there be no doubt – those responsible for state capture and corruption will be held to account.
We are restoring the rule of law.

The police and prosecutors will be further strengthened and their independence will be assured, so that they can act against those who are corrupt without fear or favour.

We are determined that those found guilty of corruption or involvement in state capture will not be allowed to occupy positions of responsibility, either in the ANC, in Parliament or in government.

The era of impunity is over.

We are now entering the era of accountability.

We are now entering the era of consequence.

As the African National Congress, we have embarked on a path of renewal and rebuilding.

We acknowledge the mistakes we have made.

We recognise how patronage and corruption have eroded the people’s trust and confidence, and how they have undermined our ability to serve the interests of all South Africans.

That is why we have been working hard to restore the integrity of our movement.

We have been working to rebuild structures that are in touch with the people and which take forward the struggles of communities.

We are working to ensure that public representatives serve their communities diligently, selflessly and honestly.

We are working to restore the ANC to an organisation worthy of leaders like Chief Albert Luthuli, Moses Kotane, Lilian Ngoyi, Oliver Tambo, Nelson Mandela, Dulcie September, Elijah Barayi, Albertina Sisulu, Chris Hani and Joe Slovo.

The people of South Africa expect and demand nothing less.

Today is a call to action.

It is a call to action to the amavoluntiya, the tens of thousands of ANC members and supporters who have campaigned over many months with great enthusiasm and dedication.

We thank you for your hard work.

We salute your commitment to a better and brighter South Africa for all.

However, our biggest task still lies ahead.

On Wednesday, each and every one of us must go from ward to ward, street to street, door to door to get out the vote.

We cannot allow all the hard work of the last few months to be wasted.

We cannot allow all our hopes of growth and renewal to be dashed.

We must do everything within our means to ensure that every ANC voter casts their ballot and that every ANC vote is counted.

The work we do over the next few days will determine the future of our country for many years to come.

Today is a call to action to the people of South Africa.

It is a call to join us on this journey of hope and renewal.

It is a call to every South Africans to go to the voting station where you are registered and cast your vote for the ANC.

Stations are open from 7am to 9pm.

Remember to take your ID book or identity card or temporary ID certificate.

And remember you have two votes, one for national and one for provincial.

Although the ballot paper is very long, it is very easy to find the ANC.

You will see the name of the ANC, the logo – in the form of the spear, the shield and our black, green and gold flag – and the face of a certain gentleman at number 4 on the national ballot and at number 2 or 3 on the provincial ballots.

For the first ballot, vote ANC.

For the second ballot, vote ANC.

There is no alternative.

Today, we want to thank the many, many South Africans we have met over the last few months, who have shared with us their worries, their suggestions, their hopes and their dreams.

Ours is a message of national unity, hope and renewal – not hatred, drama and empty rhetoric.

We call on South Africans to vote for the only party that can unite South Africans in realising our common aspirations for a better life.

Let us build a nation of solidarity, where each takes responsibility for the wellbeing of the other,

Let us build a nation of honesty and integrity.

Let us build a great country, which belongs to all South Africans, and in which all South Africans belong.

To all the people of our country, our message is a simple one:

Let us join hands and grow South Africa together!

Vote ANC.

 

 

Zola Skweyiya

THE ANC VETERANS LEAGUE PAYS TRIBUTE TO COMRADE ZOLA SKWEYIYA

The family of Cde Zola Skweyiya, members of the ANC, Veterans of our glorious movement, ladies and gentlemen.

Its an honour for us as members of the ANC Veterans League to be part of the family as it unveils the tombstone of their beloved father, grandfather and a dedicated member of the ANC and of Umkhonto We Sizwe.

It was on the  11th of April 2018 when the country was robbed of one of its most respected leader of the ANC and the country, Dr Zola Skweyiya.

Cde Zola Skweyiya was highly respected for the role he played as the head of the ANC’s legal and constitutional affairs department, which was key in the drafting of our Constitution and the negotiations towards a free and democratic South Africa.

The unveiling takes place at a time when we are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Morogoro Conference which took place in April 1969 in Tanzania.

It was on this day 25 years ago when the South African people changed the course of history and broke the bonds of colonialism and apartheid.

It was on the 27th of April 1994, that South Africa held its first non-racial and democratic elections. It was also on this day that the people of South Africa delivered a decisive majority to the African National Congress. It is through these elections that Nelson Mandela became the first black president of South Africa and committed the ANC in building a non-racial and democratic South Africa.

Comrade Zola Skweyiya was an integral part of the motive forces that changed the course of history and themselves to better the lives of the poor.

It was, Comrade Zola, because of your selfless contribution and that of other comrades who died during the course of struggle, that we are celebrating this day as free South Africans, with a constitution that is embraced and revered by all South Africans and the world. We have a constitution that advances the indivual and collective rights of our people.

We now have robust Chapter Nine Institutions, independent judiciary and parliament, that are critical to safeguarding and protecting these rights.

Our democracy unleashed the creative energies of all people in sports, arts, music, literature, film and dance as well as Science, Technology and innovation.

Today, 8 out of 10 South Africans, including those in the rural areas have their homes electrified. Nine out 10 South Africans have access to water.

Cde Zola, you will certainly be happy that the social grant programme initiated by yourself has improve the quality of poor citizens’ lives.

The number of individuals on social grants has increased from 3 million in 1994 to 17,5 million in 2017, benefiting children, the elderly and people with disability.

As the ANC, we look back with pride of what we have achieved, However, we must admit that we could have done better, particularly accelerating service delivery to the poor.

Comrade Zola, before you departed from this world you were worried about the future of your organisation and the country.

Instability and looting at State Owned Enterprises, loss of three Metros during the local government elections to the opposition, and the violation of the South African Constitution by our ANC government, were of great concern and took a toll on your health.

As the ANC Veterans, we are confident that with the leadership of Comrade Cyril Ramaphosa, we will return our glorious movement to its former glory.

The State Capture, the Zondo Commission, the Nugent Commission, PIC Commission and the Justice Yvonne Mokgoro Commission, have laid bare the level of corruption committed by our once trusted comrades.

It is true we had veered off course. However, we are now on the road to recovery.

As Veterans we support the initiative by the president to cleanse the ANC and to back its integrity and credibility.

We are encouraged that the movement is determined to show zero tolerance in the fight against corruption and misconduct within the ANC.

We want to assure you, Comrade Zola, that we will not disappoint you. we will work hard and tirelessly as you did to bring back the values, traditions and principles of our glorious movement.

On the lists process of those going to our national and provincial parliaments, we would humbly request that those that are implicated in corrupt activities, and involved in unethical behaviour and lied under oath should withdraw from the lists.

Our national and provincial parliaments and our people deserve better. As we prepare for the most contentious elections on the 8th of May, we humbly request all South African to give the ANC another mandate to govern the country on their behalf.

In your name and those that sacrificed and laid their lives for this country, we will ensure that we unite the society, deliver on our mandate and improve the quality of our people’s lives.

I thank you.
Snuki Zikalala
President of the ANC Veterans League

ANC Veterans League

ASSEMBLY OF THE ANC VETERAN`S LEAGUE AND SENIOR CITIZENS OF THE NORTH WEST PROVINCE

We, the undersigned members of the ANC Veterans League and Senior Citizens representing the four regions of the N. West province being Ngaka Modiri Molema, Dr Kenneth Kaunda, Dr Ruth S Mompati and Bojanala have assembled today, the 28 April 2019 in Rustenburg.

ANC Veterans League workshop

We met in the names of Dick Montshiwa, Moses Kotane, JB Marks, Dr. Modiri Molema, Kgosi Ramotshere Moiloa, Luthuli Detachment, Philemon Mathole, Steve Segale, Victor Sefora and Job Shimankane Tabane (Cassius Maake).

For many years we were playing an active and critical role towards the liberation of our country in the four pillars of struggle which are mass mobilisation, underground work, military operations under Umkhonto we Sizwe and the international isolation of apartheid.

We are assembled here today to deliberate on how to re-enforce the mother body, the ANC and how to ensure that we win the forth coming elections on May 8, 2019. We reaffirm and commit ourselves that we shall not spare any strength nor effort in ensuring a resounding victory of the ANC on the 2019 National Elections.

Today, we the Veterans League, and the Senior Citizens of the Province of the North West commit ourselves to totally immerse ourselves in the last push of the ANC election campaign to ensure that we secure a resounding and overwhelming victory on the 8 May 2019 National Elections.

The assembly is of the view that for us to be strong, we must have the structures on the ground with a clear Programme of Action (PoA). We also, need to relaunch and establish the functional and vibrant structures of the ANC, Alliance and Leagues as per their Constitutions from the branches to national level. Where these do not exist, we need to set them up after the elections.

The assembly also discussed the calibre of the candidates on the ANC list both provincially and at national level. We call on the ANC to ensure that those implicated in fraud and corruption, e.g. Mediosa, on VBS scandals, money laundering and racketeering, should step aside for the sake of the ANC and allow the processes to unfold and not compromise nor taint the ANC as it will negatively impact on our battle for a resounding victory.

We recommend to the ANC President to apply his mind carefully on who the Premier candidate should be based on the challenges faced by the North West province. We propose that he uses the criteria of integrity, honesty and compassion for the poor and marginalised people of the province.

The four regions, which are Bojanala, Dr Kenneth Kaunda, Dr Ruth S. Mompati and Ngaka Modiri Molema accordingly support the NEC decision to refer all Election Lists to the National Integrity Commission.

African National Congress

STATEMENT BY THE AFRICAN NATIONAL CONGRESS ON TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF FREEDOM

Today marks 25 years of Freedom for our country.

The African National Congress (ANC) joins millions of South Africans in commemorating Freedom Day. This occasion demands that we reflect on the strides we have made as a nation since the dawn of democracy and the challenges that still lie ahead.

To the ANC, Freedom Day is a monumental milestone. We have come a long way as a nation.

After defeating apartheid, many of us thought that ending injustice and inequality would be easy to achieve. We achieved much but the struggle against poverty and hunger will not end until we radically interrupt the structure of our economy. The struggle for a better life for all must continue.

Freedom Day is a stark reminder that the freedom and rights that we enjoy today did not come cheap. Many people paid the ultimate price in the fight for democracy. In memory of the sacrifices of millions of South Africans, including those who lost their lives in the struggle, we have a duty to defend the gains of the national democratic revolution.

This day remains an important one to the ANC as we reflect on the journey we have traversed as a nation in our quest to build a humane and people-centred nation.  The ANC calls on the entire nation never to forget where we come from and to continue with our journey to build a united, non-racial, non-sexist and democratic society.

Today should not be seen as an ordinary day. We must use this day to remember and pay tribute to many of our people who perished in the course of the struggle for freedom. While many strides have been made by the ANC government to improve the lives of South Africans, the ANC believes that more still needs to be done to expand access to a better life for all.

When the ANC was established in 1912, one of its key strategic objective was to build a united South Africa where people have equal rights. Undoing the legacy of our ugly past remains work in progress.

South Africans must always remember that apartheid was a system that used to thrive on building walls of division, a system that stifled the freedom and growth of all South Africans.

However, through the bravery of many leaders, including former President of the ANC John Langalibalele Dube, Inkosi Albert Luthuli, Pixley ka Isaka Seme, Oliver Tambo, Nelson Mandela, Steve Biko, Robert Sobukwe, Lilian Ngoyi, Albertina Sisulu, Govan Mbeki, Josie Palmer, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Joe Slovo, Braam Fischer, Walter Sisulu, Charlotte Maxeke, Ray Alexander, Gertrude Shope, Amina Cachalia, Dorothy Nyembe, Hellen Joseph, Amina Chachalia, Ahmed Kathrada
among many others, our country is now free.

The ANC calls on all South Africans to work together with their movement to demolish the demon and legacy of racism, sexism and its stubborn manifestations that continue to haunt our people.

The constitutional injunction which declares that the Republic of South Africa is one, sovereign, democratic state founded on the values of human dignity, the achievement of equality and the advancement of human rights and freedom remain our guiding light.

As our country marks two weeks before it goes into the sixth national general election, the ANC calls on all South Africans to join hands in our collective quest to grow South Africa together.

Pieter Louis Myburgh book launch in Sandton.

THE ANC VETERANS LEAGUE CONDEMNS THE INTIMIDATION AND THREATS OF BURNING OF BOOKS

The ANC Veterans League, tried and tested members of the ANC, serve as the custodian of the ANC values, principles and policies. We condemn, with the contempt it deserves, the actions of individuals who disrupted the launch of Pieter-Louis Myburgh’s book Gangster State: Unravelling Ace Magashule’s web of capture.

Gangster State Book

The protesters stormed the store and ripped pages from the book which they threw around before security at Sandton Exclusive Books escorted them out.This atrocious behaviour occurred just prior to the launch of the Oliver Tambo School of Leadership. To quote the President of the ANC, Cyril Ramaphosa, the school will produce “cadres who understand the fundamental values and principles of our movement, cadres who reject all forms of intolerance and intimidation.” He unambiguously distanced the ANC from the outrageous disruption of the launch, which is not what the ANC stands for, and made it crystal clear that the school will produce “cadres who, like all of us, condemn in no uncertain terms, the actions of those who disrupted a book launch in Johannesburg a few days ago and who call for books to be burned.”

As the ANC Veterans League we call on young people to desist from burning or encouraging others to burn books that they do not agree with. We remind young people of the burning of books associated with the fascism and genocide of the 2nd World War. We urge young people to read books, critique books, write books. We urge young people to desist form thuggery and win their arguments by the strength and clarity of their ideas. It is important that young people value education and knowledge and actively involve themselves in research, always engaging with the uncomfortable truth.

The Oliver Tambo School of Leadership will definitely inculcate the culture of research, reading and appreciation of the immense sacrifices that were made by the majority of our people to usher in democracy. All cadres of the movement starting from the elected leaders will be compelled to spend some time at our School of Leadership to acquire knowledge about our rich history of the struggle and how we should defend our democracy.

Pallo Jordan reminded those who attended the launch that the founding members of the ANC were editors and writers “our first SG, Sol Plaatje, wrote in both English and Setswana. For decades his book ”Native Life in South Africa” was unavailable in South Africa because publishers would not touch it.”We must not forget that newspapers, editors and journalists who exposed the brutality of aparthied were banned by the racist regime.

We must not forget that our people laid down their lives for the freedom of expression that is enshrined in our Constitution.

The ANC Veterans League calls on young people to engage in the battle of ideas, to always research and to seek the truth. The future is in the hands of young people but has to be built on a solid foundation based on research, knowledge and of defending our constitutional values.

Snuki Zikalala
President of the ANC Veterans League

Anc Veterans_Snuki Zikalala

WHY WE SHOULD REVITALISE AND RE-ENERGISE THE VETERANS LEAGUE

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Good morning ANC Veterans and senior leadership of the ANC in the Province of the Legends of our struggle.

Today’s all-inclusive workshop on the elections campaign by the Provincial Elections Team of the Veterans League is to ensure that members of the Veterans League are united and fully involved in every aspect of the Eastern Cape elections campaign. It happens with only thirty days to the most contentious elections in the history of the South African elections.

It also happens when a number of small parties have been established to democratically contest the elections. Its all about weakening the ANC and not to allow us to have the majority in Parliament.

The all inclusive workshop is the first step in the revitalisation of the structures of the Veterans Leagues in the Eastern Cape after we have fully participated and ensured the ANC decisively win the elections on 8 May.

At the last ANC NEC meeting that took place on 1 April 2019, where a thorough assessment was made on our elections campaign, the ANC Youth League and the Veterans League were sighted by our President Cyril Ramaphosa as structures that were absent during the elections campaign.

Anc Veterans

It is a fact that leaders and members of the Veterans League are not visible and are not part of the provincial and national elections campaigns.

As long serving members of the ANC, we have to lead by example. We have to revatalise ANC branches, our regional and provincial structures and ensure that we are part of our well-oiled elections machinery that will lead us to a resounding victory on May the 8th 2019.

As Veterans of the ANC we must admit that since the late Cde Norushe was elected as the Deputy President of the Veterans League in October 2017, the Eastern Cape Veterans League has not played its most critical role of mobilising, uniting, and intervening authoritatively on all issues that affect the integrity and credibilty of our glorious movement.

It is our duty and responsibility to change the Veterans League from a passive, ineffective and docile League to a more robust, constructive and authoritative league that has the authority to restore the integrity and credibility of our organisation.

The involvement of members of the Veterans League in the Integrity Commision which will soon have powers to summon members of the ANC to appear before it to answer allegations or complaints of unethical conduct is of primary importance.

As ANC Veterans we should strive and insist to have leaders who are beyond reproach. The integrity of the ANC is sacrosant.

We should ensure that we involve skilled, experienced and well-grounded members of the Veterans Leagues at our most crucial sub committees of the ANC like: Organisation and Building Campaigns, Communications, Constitutional Affairs, Commission on Religious Affairs, Economic Transformation, Education and Health, Elections, International Relations, Legislature and Governance, National Appeals Committee, Disciplinary Committee, Peace and Stability and others.

We should raise our voice loudly against corruption, unethical behaviour and wrong doing wherever it occurs in our ranks and in government. We must also inculcate the culture of holding meetings of the National Office Bearers as well as Provincial Office Bearers. Meetings of the National and Provincial Working Committees, meetings of the National Executive and Provincial Executive Committees, and general meetings to report back to our constituancy.

When we had the Gauteng all inclusive workshop on the 12 March, Veterans were so excited as they met for the fisrt since their last elective conference in 2014.

One must commend the Eastern Cape for being the only province that had a Provincial Consultative Conference.

However, for us to hold the above meetings, we have to be financially independent and aggressively raise funds for the Veterans League.

Our leadership must ensure that our Provincial Government implements the 30 per cent set asides for women, youth, disabled and the ex-combatants.

In all honesty, the ANC leadership has high regard for the Veterans League, however, we need to work hard to earn that respect.

We are gathered here when our movement and the country had entered an era of renewal, when we are aggressively addressing problems of divisions and dysfunctionality and when we are restoring the integrity and credibility of our time-tested movement.

The Veterans League should play a leading role in restoring the integrity and credibilty of our glorious movement. We should be more active in the elections campaign, unite society and the country and ensure that we are given another chance to govern the country on behalf of society. We have nothing to lose but our country and our glorious organisation.

How do we revitalise the Veterans League in the Eastern Cape?

Our plan going forward from today’s meeting is to work with the PEC of the Veterans League in the Eastern Cape to properly constitute branches and regions of the Veterans’ League. Many of our comrades are fully fledged members of the Veterans League and there are those who qualify as members of the League but have not yet applied for membership. Others might be over 60 years of age but have not yet completed 40 years of unbroken service in the ANC as set out in the ANC Constitution. There is a category of membership that provides for your active participation and support of the work of the Veterans’ League. Every year we also have comrades who reach the age of 60, whose activism, experience and participation in the Veterans’ League is needed so that members of the Veterans’ League play their active role in the political and organisational work of the structures of the ANC.

However, our Constitution has not been amended as Veterans League Conference resolution of October 2017, that we should establish regions and plan for a provincial conference in July.

We need a solid Veterans League structure with a full-time provincial secretary and a strong Veterans League Provincial Executive.

Without a strong Veterans League we will not have a strong ANC.

As elections will take place in less than 34 days, let us leave this meeting knowing that we will actively participate in the Eastern Cape Elections Campaign under the leadership of the Eastern Cape Veterans’ League PEC.

As the ANC, we have submitted our lists of respresentatives to serve in the National Assembly and Provincial Legislatures.

We support the nomination of those who are tried and tested, credible and ethical. We do not support the inclusion in our lists of anyone who has been involved in corruption and unethical behaviour. We urge all the nominated candidates of the ANC to introspect and decline their nomination if their inclusion in the lists will in any way dent the image of our glorious movement.

We support the NEC resolution that the Integrity Commission must be given the lists of nominated candidates and summon all those implicated in unethical behaviour to account.

Let us all work for unity and ensure that we build a strong Veterans League and that will build a strong ANC that will deliver our set objectives.

We must all play an active role in ensuring that we win these elections with a resounding victory.

Amandla!
Snuki Zikalala
President of the ANC Veterans League

ANC Veterans

ALL INCLUSIVE MEETING OF VETERANS AND GAUTENG MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN , WHY WE SHOULD REVITALISE THE VETERANS LEAGUE

As outlined at the beginning of the meeting, the primary objective of today’s meeting was to ensure that the members of the Veterans League are involved in every aspect of the Gauteng ANC elections campaign. The meeting is also the first step in the revitalisation of the structures of the Veterans Leagues in Gauteng after we have fully participated and ensured the ANC decisively win the elections on 8 May.

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We are gathered today as long serving members of the ANC and are confident of that elections victory. However, we all have to work very hard for that victory. Our people are still wounded and still angry that we have disappointed them by not intervening authoritatively when our movement was on a downward spiral.

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It is not by accident that the Veterans League was formed in 2009.Our leadership had a strategic for-sight by establishing the mother of all Leagues that had the authority of intervening on all issues that affect the credibility and integrity of our glorious movement.We must admit that we were on a downward slope and society had lost confidence in us to govern on its behalf.We must also admit that corruption, gate keeping, buying of votes, arrogance and factionalism were the order of the day, hence we lost ground in the 2016 local government elections.

The Veterans League since its establishment has failed in its responsibility to intervene authoritatively on all issues that affect the integrity and credibility of our glorious movement.

We all have to change the Veterans League from a passive, ineffective and docile veterans league to a more robust, constructive and authoritative league that has the authority to restore the integrity and credibility of our glorious movement.

Involvement of members of the Veterans League in the Integrity Commission which has the power to summon members of the ANC to appear before it to answer allegations or complaints of unethical conduct is of primary importance.We should ensure that we involve skilled, experienced and well grounded members of the Veterans Leagues at our most crucial sub committees of the ANC like: Organisation and Building Campaigns, Communication, Constitutional Affairs, Commission on Religious Affairs, Economic Transformation, Education and Health, Elections, International Relations, Legislature and Governance, National Appeals Committee, Disciplinary Committee, Peace and Stability and others.

The Veterans Leagues must raise its voice loudly against corruption, unethical behaviour and wrong doing wherever it occurs in our ranks and in government.

We must also inculcate the culture of holding meetings of the National Office Bearers and Provincial Office Bearers. Meetings of the National and Provincial Working Committees, meetings of the National Executive and Provincial Executive Committees and general meetings to report back to our constituency.

For us to hold the above meetings we have to be financially independent and aggressively raise funds for the Veterans League.

In all honesty, the ANC leadership has high regard for the Veterans League, however, we need to earn that respect.

We have to be ethical, hardworking, committed and ensure that we protect the integrity, values and the credibility of of our glorious movement.

We are gathered here when our movement and the country had entered an era of renewal, when we are aggressively addressing problems of divisions and dysfunctionality and when we are restoring the integrity and credibility of our glorious movement.

The Veterans League should play a leading role in restoring the integrity and credibility of our glorious movement. We should be more active in the elections campaign, unite society and the country and ensure we are given another chance to govern the country on behalf of society. We have nothing to lose but our country and our glorious movement.

How do we revitalise the Veterans League’ in Gauteng.

Our plan going forward from today’s meeting is to work with the PEC of the Veterans League in Gauteng to properly constitute branches and regions of the Veterans’ League. Many of our comrades are fully fledged members of the Veterans League and there are those who qualify as members of the League but have not yet applied for membership. Others might be over 60 years of age but have not yet completed 40 years of unbroken service in the ANC as set out in the ANC Constitution. There is a category of membership that provides for your active participation and support of the work of the Veterans’ League. Every year we also have comrades who reach the age of 60, whose activism, experience and participation in the Veterans’ League is needed so that members of the Veterans’ League play their active role in the political and organisational work of the structures of the ANC.

Comrades have filled in a registration form for this meeting and after elections we will use the information provided to form branches aligned to the sub regions and zone in each of the five regions of Gauteng. The branches will be launched with an elected leadership in June. At the same meeting we intend that delegates will be chosen for regional conferences and we hope will take place in July. At the regional conference we intend that delegates will be chosen for a Provincial Conference in August or September. In the meantime, each branch will be deployed to work with a

cluster of branches in the sub region or zone where they are located to that structures of the ANC, the Women’s League and the Youth League are able to make a full and rich contribution to the work of the ANC, to the movement and to the life of the nation as set out in the ANC Constitution.

The elections will take place in less than 60 days. Let us leave this meeting knowing that we will actively participate in the Gauteng Elections Campaign under the leadership of the Gauteng Veterans’ Leagues PEC. Tomorrow political parties will be submitting their lists of representatives to serve in the National Assembly and Provincial Legislatures. We support the nomination of those who are tried and tested, credible and ethical. We do not support the inclusion in our lists of anyone who has been involved in corruption. We urge all the nominated candidates of the ANC to introspect and decline their nomination if their inclusion in the lists will in any way dent the image of our glorious movement.

Let us all work for unity and ensure that we build a strong Veterans League and that will build a strong ANC that will deliver our set objectives.

We must all play an active role in ensuring that we win these elections with a resounding victory.

Amandla!
Snuki Zikalala
President of the ANC Veterans League

Bonisile Norushe

In Memory of Comrade Norushe

The Premier of the Eastern Cape, Comrade Norushe’s family, our Veterans who came from our different provinces to bury this revolutionary giant, dear comrades, esteem mourners, fellow South Africans.

It was on the 31st of January 2019 when our deputy president, our comrade, a revolutionary giant closed his eyes and had his last breath as a living soul on this planet.

As the ANC Veterans League, we are saddened by the untimely death of this trusted and committed cadre of our revolutionary movement.

Comrade Norushe has not been well for some time, but he never succumbed to the injuries he sustained as a result of torture meted by the brutal apartheid regime.

“Snuki, the boers were brutal. When they arrested me in the early 80’s, they lifted me up and threw me on the concrete floor like a bag of mielie meal. My back was severely injured, I could not walk for days but I never submitted. Lately because of age, my back is giving in and I am unable to walk long distances. I now have to use a wheel chair when moving from one place to the other. I am booked for a back operation and it’s a delicate one, but I will never give up. We have to build a strong and vibrant Veterans League that will help our glorious movement to build a strong and united ANC, an ANC that will deliver on its mandate to society,” he would say.

Illness did not deter Comrade Norushe from attending our most important meetings of uniting the Veterans League and the ANC.

Comrade Norushe was very ill when he attended our last meeting in December in Johannesburg.

His main focus and energies were on uniting and building a strong Veterans League capable of mobilising society to support our glorious movement, the ANC, and win the forthcoming elections.

I have worked intimately with Comrade Norushe as from October 2017 when both of us were elected as leaders of the ANC’s Veterans League. I was fortunate that he had been the Chairperson the ANC Veterans League in the Eastern Cape since 2009 and was frustrated by its inability to confront and intervene authoritatively on issues that affected the dignity, integrity and uprightness that are the true reflection of our values.

The two of us were groomed by the ANC and the South African Congress Trade Unions (SACTU) and worked with giants like our Isithwalandwe Comrade John Nkadimeng. We were both energetic and passionate about reviving the Veterans League which has been moribund since it was established in 2009. Its critical, constructive and authoritative voice was silent when our integrity and credibility was severely undermined.

It is not by accident that the Veterans League was established in 2009, thanks to our leadership. They had a strategic foresight of establishing a League that had the authority to intervene on all issues that affected the integrity and credibility of our glorious movement. Our leadership saw that we were on a downward slope and that society was losing confidence in us to govern on its behalf. Corruption, arrogance, gate keeping and factionalism were the order of the day.

Our movement intervened and established the mother of all Leagues, the Veterans League, to help in cleansing itself of corrupt and arrogant elements who use the power of money to corrupt our branches and erode our hard earned integrity and credibility.

As Mandela said “A movement without a vision would be a movement without moral foundation.”

To be honest and brutal, it has not been an easy 15 months since we were elected in October 2017. To change the Veterans League from a passive, dysfunctional and docile veterans league to a more robust, constructive and authoritative League that has to restore the integrity and credibility of the movement is a gargantuan task.

After all our National Office Bearers meetings, comrade Norushe would say in disbelieve: “We can’t believe this! What is happening, why should comrades refuse to adapt to change. We must all be committed in building a strong united and accountable Veterans League that will save the ANC and our country, its really unbelievable.”

All this has invariable taken a toll on Cde Norushe’s health.

We must however all admit that change is constant and humans, as evolutionary beings, are predisposed to resist change because of risks associated with it.

Comrade Norushe as the Deputy President of the Veterans League was a perfectionist and demanded accountability. He wanted the Veterans League Office Bearers to meet four times a month with a well-structured agenda and deliverables. It is still a myth. But will eventually get there. Every statement that I issued as the President of the Veterans League had to be approved by him. Comrade Norushe wanted to know what our inputs will be at the ANC National Working Committee meetings and at the ANC Executive Committee meetings.

He would gently instruct: “Make sure that you get a mandate on issues that will be discussed at those meetings and do not compromise on unethical issues. We have to ensure that our glorious movement regain its moral integrity and win the forth coming 2019 elections. Remember we are the custodians of the ANC values and principles.”

Comrade Norushe, because of his trade union background, was committed to building strong Veterans League branches, regions and Provincial structures. In the Eastern Cape, because of his hard work, regions have already been established and he has managed to unite all Veterans of our glorious movement.

Even when he was in hospital and his voice inaudible, and I would struggle to hear, Comrade Norushe would be as concerned about the movement winning the coming elections. I would later call him through his sister, Thembi Norushe and would emphasise: ”Snuki, we must organise for an all-inclusive workshop of all veterans in our provinces. Provincial structures of the ANC must present to us their election plans. We as veterans must enhance those plans, give inputs and fully participate in mobilising society to vote for our glorious movement.”

Comrade Norushe, I am happy to report to you that at our last NWC meeting, I presented the election proposal and it was accepted.

Comrade Norushe was also concerned about the election lists. He wanted that the Veterans League or the Integrity Commission be fully involved in vetting members who are nominated to go to provincial and national parliaments.

“We should ensure that those nominated have credible credentials that meet our criteria as enshrined in our document “Through the Eye of a Needle.”

Comrade Norushe you left us too soon, I do not know who will fill in your big shoes.

You left us at the time when our movement and the country had entered an era of renewal, when we are aggressively addressing problems of divisions and dysfunctionality and when we are making progress in restoring the integrity and credibility of our glorious movement.

Your incredible input when we discussed names of Veterans who are now members the ANC’s integrity Commission, whose wisdom guides our glorious movement in addressing instances of wrong doing and unethical behaviour will be truly missed.

You left us when our movement had taken bold steps to confront corruption and state capture and restore the credibility of our public institutions.

Comrade Norushe we will not disappoint you. We will commit to build a strong and united Veterans League that would help in building a strong and united ANC, and a prosperous South Africa.

You will be sorely missed
Lala Ngo Xolo Bhele

Snuki Zikalala
President of the ANC Veterans League

African National Congress

Umkhonto we Sizwe Today 16 December 2018

As we mark 57 years after the establishment of the People’s Army, Umkhonto We Sizwe, it is important to review the past and chart the future.

Some comrades are still shell-shocked, waiting for the next order from MK senior commanders. They missed the transition from the armed struggle to the political struggle. Some still blame various ANC leaders for their misfortune. Does it help to blame anybody?

Let us wake up, comrades. It is too late in the day to blame anybody. We have to solve our own problems ourselves. ANC leaders have long moved on from MK days: today it is the era of political campaigns for office, either in government or state. MK comrades must acknowledge that the terrain and the battle lines have changed. The era of armed struggle is long over and this is the era of political campaigns, just as it was in ANC before 16 December 1961. We have to campaign like all ANC activists and other political party activists to be MP, mayors and councillors etc. We should not wait for anybody to provide us with benefits, houses and pensions. We must fight for our rights, as we did in our past as freedom fighters.

Waiting for the next order today cannot be seen as being disciplined but rather living in oblivion. Next order might be from Saxonwold or Dubai … is that the order we are waiting for?

Let us join the Veterans League branches and use that structure as a vehicle to fight for all our rights within the ANC and the state. Nobody will give you anything. Nobody owes you anything. We have to fight for all our rights. There is nothing on a silver plate for us.

We fought the armed struggle as a way to achieve political freedom. Now we have to fight within the new political freedom to get our social rights such as adequate pensions, medical benefits, etc.

Nobody owes us anything, we owe it to ourselves to fight with new political tools to achieve our rights.

The democracy we fought for in SA has not yet been realised. We still do not have the right to directly elect members of parliament for ourselves – the same right that white voters had under apartheid. We have to continue fighting using new methods such as campaigns to establish parliamentary democracy where the voters will elect their members of parliament and provincial legislature directly as individual candidates who the voters know and trust, not via a proxy or party headquarters for a party list, as now.

The only black South African to have tasted that right was Dr WB Rubusana who was elected Member of Parliament for East Tembuland in 1909 before blacks were barred from parliament. As former MK comrades we believe it is a worthwhile right to campaign and fight for.

In military theory for guerrilla warfare, we ourselves were taught to use all the advantages of the terrain and to be very careful about the disadvantages. After 1990 we graduated to a new terrain, with many new advantages but also disadvantages. Our first duty is to study this terrain and apply ourselves to it, as a new form of struggle. If we failed to do this during the armed struggle, it was our own fault. It is the same today.

Adapt to the new terrain, comrades, do not expect it to adapt to us!

Sidwell Moroka [Omry Makgoale]
MK Luanda District Commander 1984

Eric Mtshali

THE ANC VETERANS LEAGUE MOURNS THE DEATH OF COMRADE ERIC MTSHALI

The ANC Veterans league is deeply saddened by the untimely death of Comrade Eric Mtshali.

Dr Vanguard Mkosana, former NEC member of South African Congress of Trade Unions reflects on the life and times of the late Eric Mtshali.

If moments of historical significance were marked by the blowing of horns and the jingling of bells SA would be standing still to observe the moment, for it has now come. The death of comrade Eric Mtshali and those of his generation mark the end of an era of a rare breed of freedom fighters who were groomed to be highly political, to be trade unionists, to be Umkhonto we Sizwe combatants, be organic intellectuals and above all to be patriotic. All these Comrade Mtshali grew to be.

Comrade Eric Mtshali was born and bred in Durban. He went to school and after Matric he was absorbed into the politics of the country. The ground was very fertile for him to grow fast politically. He was surrounded by powerful leaders both in the African National Congress, South African Communist Party (underground) and in the trade unions. These were leaders, like Chief Albert Luthuli, the then President General

of the ANC, veteran trade unionists like Stephen Dlamini, MP Naicker, Harry Gwala, George Poonen, Moses Mabhida, Dorothy Nyembe and many others. He became active mainly in the trade union movement in the roaring 1950s of the Defiance Campaign 1952, the creation of the first non-racial trade union federation, South African Congress Trade Unions 1955, the adoption of the Freedom Charter 1955, the historic women’s march to the Union Buildings 1956 and the Treason Trial 1956. As a young trade unionist he would carry the membership forms from the unorganized workers while on the other hand he collected the people’s demands for inclusion in the making of the Freedom Charter. Mtshali’s trade union activities started with organizing the dockworkers in the early fifties. When organizing the unorganized workers he encountered a practical challenge of workers who were ready to join the union of their industry while the industrial unions were mostly non-existent. The General Workers Unions were the easy route to solve the problem yet this was a direct challenge to the long established principle of organizing workers according to the industry in which they work. When SACTU was formed in 1955 it embraced the industrial principle but in its fifth Conference it passed a resolution endorsing the formation of General Workers Unions as a temporary home while the industrial unions were in the making. SACTU Local Committees were tasked to give leadership to transition the GWUs to industrial unions and Cde Mtshali played no small role in this.

Comrade Mtshali’s trade union work earned him the honour of being one of the founding members of the SACTU, the first non-racial trade union federation in SA. He attended as the leader of the delegation of African Milling WU.

When Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK) was formed in 1961 Cde Eric was tasked with the delicate work of being part of those in charge of the Command structure of MK in Natal. He did his work with distinction until circumstances forced him to go into exile in 1962. It was then that he went for military training in the then Soviet Union and Cuba. He received intelligence training as well. On his return he went to Kongwa the first ANC base in Tanzania. It was here that he rubbed shoulders with the great leaders of our Movement like uncle JB Marks, Moses Kotane, Archie Sibeko (Cde Zola Zembe), Mark Shope, Aaron Pemba (Cde BB), Chris Hani and many others under the able leadership of OR Tambo.

When Wankie and Sepolilo 1967 campaign was conceived to return as trained cadres to confront the enemy, Cde Eric’s intelligence training was put into full use.

In exile Cde Eric’s leadership skills allowed him to be given sensitive assignments without fear of failure. It was in 1971 that he was elected to the Central Committee of the SACP. His theoretical grounding was used to develop young comrades especially after 1976 when oqiniselani flooded the ranks of the ANC in exile. Cde Eric used his training in dialectics to tackle any challenge he encountered. This made him renown as one who would not jump to conclusions but consider all angles of the problem before he aired his views.

The ANC assigned him the responsibility to be the Chief Representative (Ambassador equivalent) in Tanzania where he served until 1976. SACTU deployed him to the World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) in Prague to relieve Cde Moses Mabhida who was needed for other responsibilities back in Africa. Before him the same office was serviced by comrades Wilton Mkwayi, Mark Shope, Moses Mabhida then Eric Mtshali who was followed by Joe Molokeng the last SACTU representative at WFTU.

Ray Alexander arguably the mother of progressive trade unionism in SA, working with ILO, linked up with the WFTU Prague based comrades listed above to reignite the trade union movement after the so-called political lull, which followed repression and the banning of the political organisations in 1960. Cde Eric used the broad international network of friends and supporters to mobilise resources necessary to pursue the SA struggle for freedom.

On his return from Prague to Lusaka in 1982, Cde Eric who was a National Executive Committee member of SACTU was charged with the responsibility of Head of Propaganda, Information & Publicity Department of SACTU. This responsibility also meant that he would be the editor of Workers Unity –the SACTU journal. SACTU offices in Western Europe and in Africa flooded SA with literature on progressive trade unionism. Similarly Radio Freedom broadcasting from different Frontline States had a slot, Workers Front which was dedicated to trade union mobilization and education.

At this stage SACTU was under the leadership of comrades John Nkadimeng as General Secretary, Mark Shope as Head of Education, Aaron Pemba/BB as Head of International, Mhleli Mgwayi/Cde Gazi as Head of Internal Department of SACTU, Cde Kay Moonsamy as Treasurer and Cde Stephen Dlamini as President. These are luminaries of trade unionism in South Africa. They consciously built the next generation of leaders. They would say give young people space to work, to explore and commit mistakes so that they could learn from them.

In the 1988 SACTU conference they handed over leadership to the younger comrades and remained as mentors until SACTU resolved to phase out in favour of COSATU in 1990 after the unbanning of political organisations and return of the exiles.

The Movement can pride itself for having produced one of the refined organic intellectuals in the person of Cde Eric whose ideas found expression in the development of dynamic young trade union leaders of the late 1970s and 1980s who are the current leaders of SA.

From
Snuki Zikalala
President of the ANC Veterans League